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Brazil country information

Brazil map
Federative Republic of Brazil
Area: 8,514,877 sq km
Population: 190,132,630
Population density: 22 per sq km
Capital: Brasilia
Passport & Visa
Passport Required?
British Yes
Australian Yes
Canadian Yes
USA Yes
Other EU Yes
Visa Required?
British No
Australian Yes
Canadian Yes
USA Yes
Other EU 1

Passports

Passports valid for at least six months from date of entry required by all nationals referred to in the chart above.

Passport Note

All non-Brazilian nationals under 18 years of age, when not accompanied by both parents, must have a birth certificate (an original or authenticated photocopy). This must be in English, French, Portuguese or Spanish, otherwise an official translation must be presented as well. When travelling alone or with one parent, a declaration from the absent parent(s) must be presented authorising the journey and giving the name and address of the person in Brazil who will be responsible for the minor. In the case of divorced or deceased parents, papers attesting to full custody must be presented.

All travellers must be in possession of onward or return tickets and sufficient funds to cover their stay.

Visas

Required by all nationals referred to in the chart above except the following:
(a) 1. nationals of EU countries (except nationals of Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia and Malta who do require a visa) for touristic and business stays of up to 90 days;
(b) transit passengers continuing their journey to a third country by the same or first connecting flight, provided holding onward documentation and not leaving the airport.

Note:
Nationals not referred to in the chart above are advised to contact the embassy to check visa requirements.

Types of Visa and Cost

Tourist: cost varies according to nationality. Generally, it is around £30. Other prices, based on reciprocity, are £28 (for nationals of Australia); £52 (for nationals of Canada); free, but £104 processing fee (for nationals of the USA). British citizens requiring visas with a validity over 180 days will be subject to a processing fee of 124. Business and Transit: cost varies according to nationality; contact the consulate for details.

Validity

Normally 90 days from date of issue, although this is at the discretion of Brazilian immigration officials. Tourist visas can be used for multiple entry within the period of validity. Tourist visas can be extended up to a further 90 days, provided the application is made at least two weeks before the expiration of the visa. Nationals should apply in Brazil to the federal police; this must be done before the visa expires or there is a risk of deportation.

Note: Some Brazilian immigration officials have been restricting single male tourists aged 25-50 to stays of up to 30 days, particularly in the northeast region, in an effort to combat sex tourism.

Applications to:

Consulate (or consular section at the embassy). Applications made through travel agents or by post are subject to an additional fee.

Working Days Required

Depends on nationality. Up to three days for applications made in person and 10 days for applications made by a third party. Additional time is required to process applications made by post.
Getting there

Getting There by Air

Following Varig's bankruptcy, the main national airlines are TAM (JJ) (website: www.tam.com.br ) and Gol (G3) (website: www.voegol.com.br ).

Approximate Flight Times

From London to São Paulo and to Rio de Janeiro is approximately 11 hours. From New York to São Paulo and to Rio de Janeiro is about 10 hours.

Main Airports

Brasilia International (BSB) is 12km (7 miles) south of the city. To/from the airport: Buses run regularly to the city centre (journey time - 30 minutes). Taxis are also available (journey time - 15 minutes). Facilities: Left luggage, first aid, snack bar, post office, banks/bureaux de change, bar, restaurant, shops and car hire. 

Rio de Janeiro (GIG) (Galeão) is 20km (13 miles) north of the city. To/from the airport: Public buses operate 0530-2330 to the city (journey time - 40 minutes). There is an airport shuttle bus which stops at all major resorts and hotels, running every hour. Taxis are also available. Facilities: Left luggage, banks/bureaux de change, duty-free shops, a pharmacy and a small 24-hour hospital, restaurant, snack bar, car parking, tourist information, post office and car hire companies.

São Paulo (GRU) (Guarulhos) is 25km (16 miles) northeast of the city. To/from the airport: An airport bus runs every 30 minutes (journey time - 30 minutes). Taxis are also available. Facilities: Left luggage, duty-free shops, banks/bureaux de change, pharmacies, restaurants, snack bar, post office and car hire.

Further information on Brazilian airports can be found on the following website: www.infraero.gov.br .
Air Passes
Mercosur Airpass: valid within Argentina, Brazil, Chile (except Easter Island), Paraguay and Uruguay. Participating airlines include Aerolíneas Argentinas (AR), Aerolíneas Del Sur (AS) and Pluna (PU). The pass can only be purchased by passengers who live outside South America and must be booked in conjunction with an international ticket. It is valid for a minimum of seven to a maximum of 45 days. At least two countries must be visited; dates can be changed but the flight route cannot. A maximum of three stopovers is allowed per country. 

Oneworld Visit South America Pass: valid within Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Chile (except Easter Island), Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Participating airlines are American Airlines (AA), British Airways (BA), Cathay Pacific (CX), Iberia (IB), Japan Airlines (JL), LAN (LA) and Qantas (QF). The pass must be bought outside South America in the country of residence. It allows unlimited travel to over 30 cities. A minimum of three flights must be booked, with a maximum of 20; prices depend on the amount of flight zones. For further details, contact one of the participating airlines.
Departure Tax
None.

Getting There by Water

The main port is Rio de Janeiro (website: www.portosrio.gov.br ), which is used by many international cruise ships.

Other popular ports include Manaus, Fortaleza (website: www.docasdoceara.com.br ), Recife (website: www.portodorecife.pe.gov.br ), Salvador (website: www.codeba.com.br ) and Vitória.

Passenger services are limited but Grimaldi Freighter (tel: +39 81 496 203, in Italy; website: www.grimaldi-freightercruises.com ) does offer sailings from Europe. Most major international cruise lines sail to Brazilian ports.

Getting There by Rail

Rail travel is not a really a viable way of getting to or from Brazil, but there is the Trem da Morte (Train of Death) route between Santa Cruz in Bolivia and Corumbá in Brazil, which is popular with backpackers travelling to the Pantanal. Contact Ferroviaria Oriental (website: www.ferroviariaoriental.com ) for more information.

Getting There by Road

It is possible to drive or travel by bus to Brazil from all surrounding countries. Entry points include the border with Argentina at Foz de Iguaçu, the border with Uruguay at Jaguarão and from Santa Elena de Uairén in Venezuela.

There are plenty of bus routes from surrounding countries, and it is possible to travel to Brazil from Montevideo (Uruguay), Buenos Aires (Argentina) and as far away as Santiago (Chile). International bus companies include Pluma (tel: (41) 3212 2689; website: www.pluma.com.br ) and Crucero del Norte (tel: (11) 6221 0277; website: www.crucerodelnorte.com.ar ).
Cycling & Maps
Cycling in Brazil
Bordering every country except Ecuador and Chile, Brazil occupies almost 50% of South America in total. It is the world's fifth biggest country and therefore, it stands to reason that cycling in Brazil is as varied as it is large. Subdivided into 26 states and territories plus one federal district of Brasilia, each region has its own peculiarities, terrain and diversity.

Our cycling tour through Brazil only incorporated southern and mid-west states, though a few times, we did stray from the usual cycle path to discover a couple of unique bike routes.

CYCLING IN RIO GRANDE DO SUL
Capital:
Porto Alegre (3.1 million)
Crossing at Chuy from Uruguay is very easy and nothing much changes in the way of landscape. It is virtually flat the entire way to Capão da Porteira. Wind blows in every direction in this landscape of either cow or rice farmland interspersed by forest industry. While there might be nothing particularly exciting about the scenery, Brazilians get quite animated about seeing cyclists here. There are plenty of of thumbs up and hopas [hellos]. Except for the recently paved section after the half hour ferry crossing from Rio Grande to São Jose do Norte. [2 reais each and 4.50 reais in total for the bikes], road conditions are pretty poor. Still, there are no longer any dirt sections of highway in this area.

Quite special and possibly the only real attraction along this cycling stretch is the small but quite happening Ecological Reserve of Taim. You actually get to ride right through the middle of it and it is a great opportunity to photograph and see not only crocodiles and tonnes of marshlands birds, but also the unusually oversized hamsters called capybaras. They are the largest rodent on earth and they certainly live up to this colossal record. Even more surprising is the way that they and crocodile apparently live side by side, but as a local pointed out: there are so many capybaras, that the crocs rarely go hungry. I suppose he has a point.

On the subject of food, most towns along the way have some form of market or store where you can get basic supplies. Water and other drinks are also available at petrol stations. In 2010, Brazil's longest highway (4600 kilometres) from Mostardas to the turnoff to Porto Alegre is badly potholed. The highway from this point leading into Porto Alegre is nightmare cycling in busy traffic with no or little shoulder.

CYCLING IN PARANÁ
Capital:
Curitiba (1.75 million)
The road work department of Paraná (SAU) has rest rooms and free coffee at all the toll booths on their highways, which make perfect little stopping points along this notoriously undulating stretch of cycling. From Foz do Iguaçu to Curitiba, it is a total of 644 kilometres and a whopping 8537 metres of altitude gain. Coupled with the high chance it will rain - Paraná is renowned for this - and the frequent winds, a freebie hot drink and spot to warm up is a welcomed respite.

Scenery wise you can expect miles and miles of rolling corn and soya beans. Since heavy truck traffic also has a little trouble getting up the hills, a slow lane often appears, which marks the end of your cycling shoulder. For obvious safety reasons, it is best to switch sides of the road and ride on the shoulder. Locals do this too and in general, cyclists can pretty well ride wherever they like in Brazil. Every now and again, to prevent drivers from overtaking and driving on shoulders, the road workers have punctuated them with speed humps every couple of wheel revolutions. it is so infuriating, that you end up cycling on the road.

The 285 kilometre trip from Curitiba to Miracatu via the Estrada Graciosa and Atlantic coast islands is detailed in our mini Tour guide: Biking Beaches in Brazil. This is one of the great cycling adventures Brazil has on offer.

CYCLING IN SÃO PAULO
Capital :
São Paulo (16 million people)
São Paulo is not a particularly pleasant state to cycle through. Heavy traffic dominates a spaghetti network of concrete highways and plenty of debris dominates the shoulders while slums line the route. Ill-maintained roads make for some pretty ugly pedalling too and there are fewer camping opportunities even at the petrol stations. The coastal riding, though incredibly steep in parts, from Bertioga to Paraty is much more rewarding.

CYCLING IN RIO DE JANEIRO
Capital:
Rio de Janeiro (11 million)
Don't believe tales of horror about cycling into Rio De Janeiro, it is not a difficult city to get in to. The favela [slums] indicated on Google maps in 2010, on the outskirts of the city do not exist these days. The area has been turned into chic apartment blocks and from Parc Chico a 17 kilometre bike path leads you towards the centre. A leg crunching climb over the steep gradients of the hill in Joã lead you through the last 15 kilometres of cycling of which most are back on another ocean front cycle path. It drops you off literally on the stunning white sands of Ipanema Beach.

There are an amazing network of cycle paths running around Rio taking you through tunnels and along the middle of busy highways. They lead you to and from the promenades, where you can comfortably cycle along lanes filled with joggers, walkers; inline skaters and fellow bikers. It is a wonderful way to get around the city.

From Ipanema Beach to the Niteroi ferry terminal it is practically one continuous 16 kilometres of bike route. Just before the path ends at the airport, you need to get off the comfort zone and back onto highway. Zig zag your way through back streets to make your way to the ferry gate at Praça XV [Plaza or Square 15]. Heading out from the heart of Niteroi, there is only a fast and furious highway to navigate with no shoulder. Riding on the footpath for a small part of the journey might be the only option. Locals do this too.

CYCLING IN MINAS GERAIS
Capital: Belo Horizonte (3.8 million)
The highways vary greatly in this region and while some are asphalt, there are a great number made from concrete slabs. The terrain in incredibly undulating with steep gradients especially around Ouro Preto. Our cycle tour from Tres Rios to Belo Horizonte mostly on bitumen roads was 470 kilometres long with 6756 altitude metres. Probably the most significant part of our trip was spend on cycling The Estrada Real.

The Estrada Real is a Portuguese initiated gold route from the late 1600's used to transport precious metals and stones discovered in Minas Gerais to Paraty and Rio De Janiero. Around 1400 kilometres of highway and dirt path intertwine through 19th century towns and villages creating a network of trails suitable for hiking and biking. But be warned, you need to have plenty of time for travelling this region. The signposting is not particularly good and finding the exact trail is difficult, especially if you don't speak any Portuguese. The other unfortunate factor is that the official website, with mountains of information is only on Portuguese. Below are links to the four individual routes from this official site.

The Estrada Real Map shows the following routes:
Caminho dos Diamantes: Diamantina to Ouro Preto
Caminho Velho: Ouro Preto to Paraty
Caminho Novo: Ouro Preto to Porto Estrela
Caminho do Sabarabuçu: Cocais to Glaura
Also note the box prompt on each of the above pages: escolha um roteiro [choose your route] at the top right hand side. It has links to every stage of each of the four Caminho journeys complete with difficulty factors; distances; elevation charts; route details; and a google map.

The only downsides to mention are that when you have to ride along the highways, they are usually extremely busy, making the cycling effort quite stressful. Often there is no shoulder either and gradients can be extremely steep. Getting of the beaten track and onto the dirt trails would then seem like the logical solution, but remember these are also very difficult to ride with a loaded bike. Most paths ares in reasonable condition, but they undulate even more than the direct highways and after rain, you can expect plenty of slipping and sliding in thick mud. Be prepared for an adventure if you embark on this sort of cycle touring in Brazil.

Brazilian traffic and road conditions from a cyclists perspective
Cycle paths are few and far between in Brazil, though Rio De Janiero and Recife, both have an excellent network of beachfront tracks. Even so, pedalling in and around Brazilian towns s a perfectly acceptable means of transport. Pedalling outside the metropolis area however, is anything but perfect. You will find yourself sticking to the highways, of which the majority are horrendously busy, because the alternative of deviating down side tracks will mean hours pushing up and down steep gradients and boggy potholed track conditions.

A shoulder is generally available, at least on one side of the road, though the tendency near towns is it becomes full of rubbish and quite often glass. On the steeper gradients a slow lane for heavy trucks means the disappearance of your shoulder and riding on the shoulder on the wrong side of the road is the safest option. You'll see locals doing this too and it appears that bicycles can ride just about anywhere they like in Brazil.

Driving attitudes are fast and fierce and Brazilians take aggressive risks. They travel way too close to one and other while rocketing along at spaceship speed, they cut corners, they run red lights, they overtake on blind bends, double lines and via the shoulder, which has resulted in kilometres of annoying speed humps along the only area a cyclist might feel safe on. You get the distinct impression that Brazilians think they are exempt from obeying traffic rules.

Truck drivers are in general quite pleasant: you'll get the thumbs up for your cycling efforts and they do try and give you space, if there is room. If there isn't, then that's a totally different story, which is why it is better to cycle on the wrong side of the road when your shoulder becomes a slow-lane. Horn honking is also a big thing in Brazil and the general code of conduct is to toot as you overtake someone, including the loaded cycle tourer. It becomes a bit annoying, though on most occasions well meant.

So if the traffic is maniacal, weather unpredictable and accommodation out of budget reach, then why go cycling in Brazil. Well, besides the couple of extraordinary cycle routes along Atlantic coastlines, the Estrada Real and the dynamic city of Rio De Janiero, it boils down to one thing: the people. It is kind of difficult to put the generosity of Brazilians into perspective. They open up their houses, their lives, share their food and wine and knowledge, network to get you in contact with others who in turn give you the same warm hearted treatment. If you have a problem, they will offer to help you solve it, give you discounts and they then load you up with so many gifts that your panniers will overflow. But possibly the most charming trait is how down to earth they all are. Not only were they incredibly accepting of a couple of nomadic cyclists like ourselves, but so enthusiastic about what we are doing. That they were certainly never shy about telling you either.

arrow wordiQ.com's descriptions of the main highways of Brazil
arrow Ministério dos Transportes: Brazilian Ministry of Transport's state and federal district maps. Note: pdf files are quite large and the scales of each maps vary. Some are more detailed than other.

Transporting the bike by other means
Long distance bus transport is easy with a bike, so long as you pack it suitably. While you don't have to use an official box, cardboard covering most of the bicycle or a suitable bike bag is required. Some bus companies require you to also have proof of ownership of your bicycle. In all of South America, it is wise to keep a copy of your original receipt in with your documents.

   
biking beaches in Brazil

arrow Download our Biking Beaches in Brazil Tour guide

Best and most up-to-date guide for cycling along the Atlantic coast of Brazil.

arrow Brazil Map
by Reise Know-How
scale 1:3 850 000

rip & waterproof

arrow Brasil Map
International Travel Maps
scale 1:2 200 000 (south)
scale 1:4 500 000 (north)
Cost of living
Cost of living in Brazil: all prices in Brazilian Reais (BRL)
drinks and snacks

food: local markets; restaurants; and stores

water
water
juice
juice
soft drink (can)
soft drink (bottle)
soft drink (bottle)

1.5 litre
5 litre
200ml
1 litre
300ml
600ml
2.0 litre
1.40
3.50
0.80
2.50
1.30
1.90
2.40+

bread loaf-white
bread loaf-whole grain
pan frances
pao de queijo -small
bolo - cake
brigadeiro - balls

500g
4600g
per kilo
each
400g
kg
2.40
3.40
3-8.00
1-1.80
2.20
17.00
pastel de banana
pastel de queijo- cheese
batatas frito
Lanches Napolitana
vegetarian buffet
pizza
pizza
each
each
large plate
each
all u can eat
medium
giant

0.50-1.00
1.00-1.50
8.00+
3.00+
10-15.00
10-15.00
20-25.00

beer-local (bottle/can)
beer- local (bottle)
beer - boutique

table wine (bottle)
wine-import

330ml/350ml
600 ml
330ml

750ml
750ml

1.30+/1.00+
1.60+
5.50+

5.00+
15.00+

tea
coffee (cafe / bar)
Nescafe instant
coffee - ground
25 bags
per cup
50g
250g
2.80
2.00+
4.00
2.60
rice (white)
pasta
farofa pronto- polenta
soya meat - dry
eggs
tomato extract
instant mash potato-yoki

kg
500g
500g
500g
per dozen
140 g
180g

2.20
1.10
2.50
2.90
2.50
0.80
3.50+

soya milk - fresh
milk
yoghurt / curd
cheese - Colonial
cheese - muzzarella
cheese - provolone
cheese - parmesan
olives
soya mayonaise
Magnum icecream

1 litre
1 litre
200g
kg
kg
kg
140g packet
180g
200g
each

3.30
2.50
1.05
10.00
12.00+
20.00+
1.20-1.50
1.20
1.00
3.50

potatoes
onions
tomatoes
green beans
courgette
paprika - capsicum
cabbage - white
eggplant
chickpeas
corn kernels
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
180g packet
180g packet
3.00
2.50
2.00
2.65
2.75
3.50
2.00
2.00
1.80
1.20
chips
salted peanuts_cook
japonese peanuts
salted cashews
brazil nuts
sultanas
200g pack
500g
300g
100g
kg
kg
5.90
4.90
4.50
2.80
29.00
32.00
apples
oranges
bananas
mamão [papaya]
abacaxi [pineapple]
coconut milk
kg
kg
kg
kg
each
200ml
3.50
2.50
1.20
1.50
3.00
1.30

cornflakes
chocolate
rapadura

museli bars
biscuits - plain
biscuits- deluxe

200g pack
170g block
400g block

6 x 25g
140g pack
140g
5.50
3.20
2.70

4.50+
0.80
2.20
pineapple (can)
oil (soya)
450g can
900ml
5.80+
2.00
peanut paste
jam
goiabada - quince paste
nutella
dulce de leche -manjar
honey
200g
400g jar
500g
180g
400g
350g
4.50
3.00
2.50+
6.00
3.00
4.80
* Prices obtained from the supermarket chains in the south and middle of Brazil.
Interestingly enough, small town/village shops are often cheaper than larger chain supermarkets.
Toiletry items can be purchased cheaper in 1.99 discount shops as can sweets and candy bars.
The closer to Rio de Janiero or central brazilian cities you get, the higher the price of everday items.
accommodation personal
budget city hostel
budget city hostel
budget hotel
25.00+ per dorm bed
80.00+ double + share bathroom
70.00+ double + bathroom
deodorant - roll-on
soap
shampoo
toothbrush
toothpaste

disposable razor
toilet paper
50ml
90g bar
250ml
each
100ml

2 pack
4 pack
4.50
0.55
4.50
4.00
1.75

2.30
4.50
camping


10.00 - 25.00 per person
Camp for free at all petrol stations generally including a shower
internet 2.00 - 5.00 per hour

* tba = price to be announced
* May 2010: at time of writing 1.00 USD = 2.38 BRL
all prices have been taken from internet resources such as wikitravel, hostel world, leading supermarket chains, travel blogs, forums and of course our own travel experiences and purchases of everyday products in food markets, bazaars and local shopping facilities. They are only an indication and designed to give you a general impression of the cost of living in Brazil. Items are geared towards the budget conscious traveller with an occasional craving for a bit of luxury.

A couple of extra tips:
*
Bargaining at market places, especially when buying in bulk or purchasing souvenirs is quite acceptable and in touristy areas necessary
*
Tipping in Brazil is entirely at your own discretion and not a typical custom. Some restaurants add 10% automatically to the bill, but this is not mandatory and you can refuse to pay it. If a Brazilian tips, they would pay no more than 10%.

*

Taxi drivers do not expect tips either, though rounding up the fare does take place for convenience.

*
An internet cafe is called a Lan House.
*
Banking Bradesco is one of the only banks not to charge a withdrawal fee.
*
Try to avoid withdrawing at free standing atm booths erected around tourist areas and big cities. There is a greater chance that the machine has been tampered with. Skimming bankcards is big business in Brazil.
*
Not only are traveller's cheques not accepted at banks, but they will not change over other currencies either. For this service you need a travel agent or specific money changer and these are only found in large cities and touristy areas.
Accommodation
Accommodation in Brazil
In comparison to what you get in the rest of South America, accommodation of any kind in Brazil is pricey. There are however an abundance of places to spend the night, ranging from luxoury to budget in just about every region.

Your cheapest option is to stay in a hostel of which there are 80 or so dotted across the country. They tend to be concentrated in tourist towns or near special attractions. In 2010, a dorm bed cost around 25 Brazilian Reais whereas a double room with share bathroom would easily set you back 80 Brazilian Reais. Alternatively, some of the albergues de juventude [youth hostels] will allow you to camp in the yard and use all the facilities for anything between 15 and 20 Reais per person. This price includes breakfast.

Some old hotels in the poorer parts of cities offer double rooms for BRL 40 or 50, but don't expect much for this price. Next up on the rung is the pensão or the pousada: usually small and quite often family-run establishments that rent out rooms and often supply breakfast as well. Prices vary depending on the region, services provided and the position in relation to any tourist attractions. The cheapest you can expect to pay is from 50 to 90 Reais for a double with bathroom. Hotels are generally the most expensive form of accommodation you can find and although a 1 to 5 star rating does exist in Brazil, standards are not at all uniform nor regulated.

A quarto [standard room] usually comes sem banheiro [without bathroom]. A room com banheiro [with bathroom] will cost considerably more. A motel is geared towards couples wanting to spend a few intimate hours together and although there is no problem staying there, prices are designed around hourly rates. Apart from the "love motels", nearly all accommodation prices in Brazil include a breakfast of white bread rolls, sandwich ham, cheese, sometimes cake and fruit with juice and your choice of coffee or tea.

It is important to consider holiday periods when planning your accommodation in Brazil as prices not only skyrocket, but reservations are often restricted to a minimum booking period of 3-4 days. Thus is especially true in coastal areas. Peak holiday periods in Brazil fall in the summer holidays (December and January); Carnival and Ash Wednesday (sometime in February or March); and Holy Week leading to Easter (sometime from late March through to late April).

Many budget travellers and cyclists take advantage of the wonderful network of Warmshowers; CouchSurfer's and Hospitality Club's hosts. Combined with staying in hostels, you can keep the travel budget in Brazil considerably lower.

arrow see our personal distance charts for accommodation possibilities we encountered on our Brazilian cycle tour
arrow
albergues.com.br: a list of albergues da juventude [youth hostels] mostly from Hostelling International throughout Brazil (in portuguese)
arrow HI: Hostelling International's Brazilian website with around 80 hostels most with their own website (in portuguese)
arrow braziltour.com: the informative and well set out Brazilian Tourism Portal designed by the Ministério do Tourismo. The destinations section has great general information and about the attractions each state of Brazil has on offer.

Camping in Brazil
The good news is for campers is, on the official side of things in Brazil, there are campgrounds to be found in most tourist spots especially along the coast. They are not only municipal run and privately owned places but Camping Club do Brasil has 48 campgrounds spread throughout the country.

Membership to the latter is expensive. A Passport-card costs 540 Reais for two persons for 12 months. The Adventure-card, valid for six months is 210 Reais per person. Both these memberships give you a 50% discount when using Camping Club facilities, though you will have to do quite a bit of camping at their establishments to get your money's worth. Take a look at their tabela de preços [price list] to give you an idea of what things cost. Words to note are: pernoite por pessoa [nightly rate per person] and barraca [tent]

The bad news is, camping sites can be extremely pricey and the condition of amenities equally poor. Prices per person, in off-peak season in 2010, ranged from 10 to 25 Brazilian Reais. The other downfall is, during the holiday periods you'll be lucky to find a spot in any campground near tourist and beach destinations. Prices will more than likely double and in some more popular campgrounds, you will be required to stay, or at least pay for a minimum of 3-4 days. Don't count on campgrounds being open all year round either, many of these places close down after the height of season.

This is where the Brazilian camping concept, known as “camping by the local” comes in handy. In several towns, where campsites only operate seasonally, there is someone’s backyard just waiting for you to pitch your tent. While there is no possible way of accessing a list of these places throughout the country, most tourist information offices (found in decent sized towns) will be able to direct you to the nearest local camp spot. Ranging from 5 to 15 reais per person, they are often small areas, but with facilities for an overnight stay. Conditions vary greatly.

Some youth hostels with enough space offer camping services to guests as well. At the time of writing, Hostelling International charged 15-20 Reais per person which included breakfast and the use of their inside amenities like wifi, television, kitchen and security lockers.

One unique way to keep the accommodation budget on track in Brazil is to head straight to the nearest posto de abastecimento or simply posto [petrol station]. They are usually on the outskirts or a few kilometres from the town itself, but not only can you set up camp for free, but there will be running water, a toilet, a hot shower (occasionally at nominal cost), a restaurant, shop and 24 hour security as well. The standards vary from grot-box disgusting to pristine marble with sensor taps. It just depends where you are.

One camping must in Brazil is some form of deterrent against that camping killjoy: the mosquito. Again unique to Brazil, are the square mosi-coils made of cardboard. They are worth mentioning, because not only are they unbelievably effective, but the coils don’t break into little pieces like the conventional ones and if they get wet, simply dry them out and they will burn again like new. They are available in all decent sized supermarkets, just look for the square, usually foil-covered, packaging.

The other problem you may face is rain. Brazil, especially in and around the Paraná regions and close to rain forested areas is constantly damp and there is a considerably amount of rainfall each month. Packing away a wet tent each day can become the norm. Mould is also everywhere: on and inside buildings, roadside verges and fixtures and the likelihood of it beginning to grow on your mattresses, tents, clothes and inside your panniers is high. Keep a little bottle of concentrated lemon juice handy and line your panniers with newspaper. When you do stop in dry spot, air as much of your gear out in the sun as possible.

Brazil currently has around 40 official National Parks of which about half allow visitors. Only Itatiaia National Park has camping facilities available. According to summitpost.org you can no longer camp the park, but Pousada Alsene at 2400 metres offers tent space for around BRL 15 per person including a hot shower. Comfortable rooms are also available for anything between 60 and 140 Reais The rest of the National and State Parks have no services for staying overnight and you actually have to leave the park premises by a certain time of day. If you want to know more about the parks and what they have on offer then take a look at the two links below.

arrow National Parks & State Parks of Brazil. Not the most beautifully designed webpages, but well informative.
arrow
see our personal distance charts for petrol stations with possible camping opportunities on our cycling route through Brazil
arrow Camping Club Brasil: Camping Clube do Brasil, Divisão de Campings, Rua Senador Dantas 75, 29th floor, 20037 Rio de Janeiro, Tel: (21) 2532 0203
arrow questconnect.org: a personal list of camping spots used by Don and Kim Greene while touring in their RV

For planning accommodation of any type in Brazil, it is essential to know the state and district abbreviations
States: Acre - AC | Alagoas - AL | Amapá - AP | Amazonas - AM | Bahia - BA | Ceará - CE | Goiás - GO | Espírito Santo - ES | Maranhão - MA | Mato Grosso - MT | Mato Grosso do Sul - MS | Minas Gerais - MG | Paraná - PA | Paraíba - PB | Paraná - PR | Pernambuco - PE | Piauí - PI | Rio de Janeiro - RJ | Rio Grande do Norte - RN | Rio Grande do Sul - RS | Rondônia - RO | Roraima -RR | São Paulo - SP | Santa Catarina - SC | Sergipe - SE | Tocantins - TO |
Federal District: Distrito Federal - DF

Food & drink
Brazilian Cuisine
The food of Brazil is as vibrant and eclectic as the people and traditions of this vast country. You just have to peek at its history to see how it accumulated such a melting pot of culinary styles and produce.

Native indians first planted the manioc root, a vegetable related to the potato which is still eaten frequently. Fresh, it is either mashed, fried or baked, but it is also dried to make flour for tapioca [pancakes] and farofa [similar to polenta].

Portuguese explorers colonised Brazil in the 16th century and shortly after African slaves were brought into the country. Following, the 1800's saw Europeans from Italy and Germany arriving and early in the 1900's, an influx of immigrants from Syria, Lebanon and then, Japan added to the already diverse population. All these nationalities have played a role at flavouring the cuisine of Brazil.

And since Brazil is also geographically large, it has many regions and climates that also influence cooking traditions. Even with all this variety, vegetarians are going to have a difficult time eating out here. Not only is the concept vegetarianism not really understood, but dishes that may appear to be meat-free like feijoada - bean stew- will undoubtedly contain beef or pork as well.

In the larger, more populous cities you can find vegetarian buffets and restaurants - see HappyCow for listings - but the more usual street cafe will give you a choice of pizza, macarrão [pasta], pastel, baked provolone cheese, a boring prato de legumes [plate of vegetables] or salad. It does seem a little strange when there are so many soya alternatives to be found in the supermarket. Of course, this does comes in handy for self catering and the unfortunate travelling vegan, who will find it almost impossible to eat anywhere in the country. It is difficult enough finding food items without a meat or seafood content, let alone egg and dairy free.

Like most Latin American countries, the traditional sit down meal of the day is at lunchtime. In general, though it does depend on wealth and region, it consists of beans, meat, rice and salad. A snack or light supper is had in the evening and often finished off with a dessert. Brazilians are known for their well-developed sweet-tooth. Take a look at this collection of typical Brazilian delicacies on StreetSmartBrazil.com

 
VEGETARIAN TALK - Portuguese
Eu sou um vegetariano/a = I'm vegetarian m/f
Eu não comer...ou... = I don't eat...nor...
Eu como...y... = I eat...and...
Eu não quero...o... = I don't want...or...
carne = meat
carne de porco = pork
frango = chicken
peixe = fish
ovos = eggs
leite = milk
produtos lácteos = milk products
queijo= cheese

legumes = vegetables
frutas (frescos) = (fresh) fruit

Eu quero... = I want...
Eu quero um prato contendo/com/sem ...... =
I want a dish containing/with/without ...
por favor = please
obrigado/a = thank you m/f
de nada = you're welcome
As a vegetarian, there are a number of street food items that you can enjoy: grilled corn and popcorn can be found all over the country. So can a salgadinho [salty snack] like the pastel. It is a deep fried pastry turnover filled with an array of goodies. Pancakes known as tapioca as well as churros [doughnuts] and batata frita [potato fries or chips] are also commonly available. Another street snack from African influence is acarajé: a salted deep fried muffin made from mashed black-eye beans and onions. You can normally ask for a vegetarian version which will be stuffed with hot peppers and green tomatoes. This is mostly found in the North of Brazil where the African food culture is still very strong. Cooking styles like frying in dendê [palm oil]; adding bananas to hot dishes; and using quiabo [okra] as both a vegetable and thickening agent are a few examples of Afro-Brazilian cuisine. Distinct flavours of malagueta [chili], liete de coco [coconut milk], cilantro [coriander] and gengibre [ginger] also play a vital role in traditional recipes in the North.

Cheese is another Brazilian specialty, though if you are used to European flavours they will appear quite mild in comparison. Local farmers, in the south especially, sell their produce roadside and at these shops you can also pick up some delicious goiabada [guava paste]. It comes in varying qualities which is usually depicted in the price of the preserve.

The bakery is also a delight to visit in Brazil and apart from all the usual temptation of pastries and fresh white crusty pan frances [french bread] there is also another all-time Brazilian favourite: pão de queijo. This cheesy little bread snack doesn't need the excuse of a formal meal time and is eaten at any point during the day. It is frequently enjoyed with a short strong cup of Brazilian coffee.

Brazil grows a number of nuts like the common chestnut, cashews and the countries namesake: the brazil nut. But none quite as unique as the large pinhão [pine nuts] found in the Araucaria pine abundant in the southern part of Brazil. Of course having a tropical climate, coconuts and exotic fruit are commonly eaten in Brazil too. Stalls selling fresh platters and juices can be found everywhere throughout the country.

I can't eat all that!
You may notice that the price for the meal in a local Brazilian restaurant seems a little steep, but that is because many local eateries serve meals for two persons. Of course, this doesn't mean that if you are dining alone you have to loosen the waistband and ask for a doggy bag. Most restaurants serve a meia-porção [half-size portion] too. You just have to ask the waiter for it . Normally, they will charge 60-70% of the full price.

Brazilian drinking habits
The southern areas of Brazil are synonymous with gaúchos [cowboys of the pampa]. One of their favourite pastimes, besides lighting up a churrasco [meat lover's bbq], is sipping on a maté: a rather bitter green herbal tea. A hollowed out gourd is used to contain the brew, while a metal pipe with a strainer on the end, called a bombilla acts as a straw. It is common to see people of this region carrying this apparatus around with them hanging from a belt or a small leather case that fits not only the gourd and bombilla, but also a hot water thermos and tea caddy too.

Another popular beverage that is unique to Brazil is guaraná. High in caffeine this small red fruit makes a refreshing drink that has been likened to the America cream soda It also comes in a powder form which you can mix to into any drink giving you an extra boost of power. Fruit juice stalls offer the option of adding this high energy powder to your order as well.

Brazilian beer usually comes in a 600ml bottle with the choice of a variety of different labels. Brands include: Brahma, Antarctica, Bavaria, Skol, Bohemia, Caracu and Itaipava. The are all pilsners with no real cause to get excited over the taste.

A specialty in Minas Gerais is a liquor made from the jabuticaba fruit that strangely enough grows on the trunk of a tree. This small purple-black grape-like fruit with white pulp inside is native to Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia.

Wine is also produced in Brazil, though it is a relatively new industry. Despite some glowing reports in the viticulture news, the quality to price ratio is highly inferior compared with wine coming from more renowned growing regions of South America. It is so expensive, that if you want to purchase something of reasonable standard, then I'm afraid you are better off spending the money on an import. Should your palate be accustomed to wine from Chile or Argentina, then whatever you do, don't purchase a cheap bottle of Brazilian wine (under 7 Reais). You are more than likely to pour it down the drain. Some good Brazilian wine labels with a correspondingly good price tag are: Boscato; Casavalduga; or Vinhosjolimont.

What Brazil lacks in the wine industry, it certainly makes up for it with its coffee. Being the worlds leading producer it has high quality, inexpensive blends with taste options for all moods and occasions. If you like coffee: then you are definitely in the right place.

saving you the embarrassment
Brazilians are really big on fruit juices, but another perfect thirst quencher on a warm tropical afternoon after a long day of sightseeing, is the sweet refreshing water of a chilled green coconut - água de côco. But before you start practicing your Portuguese and trying to order one, it might be handy to know that the stress should be placed on the first 'o' in côco and not the last. Otherwise you may cause a few giggles, since asking for a água de cocô' would translate as requesting some 'poo water'.

Similarly, the word cola in Portuguese means glue, so it may be better to use the full expression, 'coca-cola' instead.

Water Hygiene in Brazil
In all the major cities and the majority of towns in Brazil, the tap water is safe for drinking. Though most Brazilians purchase bottled water for personal consumption, if they can afford it. You need to pay more attention in rural and remote areas, where it does pay to treat or boil your drinking water first. though it will not often be difficult to buy water from stores and supermarkets throughout the country.

Why not try these for starters?
Baked or grilled provolone cheese
If you do get pulled along to a churrasco grill, then this will be the only dish on the menu that vegetarians can eat. And that's not a bad thing because it is absolutely delicious. You can't really go wrong with a crunchy cheesy outside and a soft cheesy inside. Sometimes sprinkled with oregano or if cooked in a pan, topped sundried tomatoes and olives for extra flavour.
Moqueca de ovos [Spicy egg stew]
Another Afro-Brazilian delight. Moqueca translates as stew and usually features plenty of seafood or meat, but it is not uncommon for cafes to serve a spicy egg dish either. More like a spicy omlette-come scrambled eggs served over rice, you can expect flavours of malagueta chilies, cilantro [coriander], garlic and sometimes even coconut milk to ring through. All typical ingredients in kitchens in the north of Brazil.
Acarajé
Acarajé is embedded firmly in religious traditions of the Candomblé belief and even though this filling little snack can be found at food markets throughout the country, it is particularly popular on street stalls in the state of Bahia. Baianas - women vendors selling the golden fried ball made from skinless, mashed black-eyed peas - are easy to identify since they wear white cotton dresses and head scarves. They split the legume patty in two and usually fill it with vatapá and caruru - spicy condiments made from okra, onion, chili, shrimp and cashew nuts. So as a vegetarian, you will need to ask for camarão [shrimp]-free version. More often than not, you'll get one with hot chilies and a red and green tomato salsa. Still mouth-watering and possibly even eye-watering too.
Pamonha [the tamale of Brazil]
Throughout Latin America, roadside restaurants specialise in serving the tamale. It is no different in Brazil and the word for this popular dish: pamonha, comes from native Indian Tupi language meaning 'sticky'. The paste, which is wrapped in corn husks, is made from boiling corn meal and milk. In the northeast of Brazil, where this food is common, they often use coconut milk instead of ordinary milk, creating a unique regional taste. They can be savory or sweet, so you have a choice, depending on your appetite. Whatever that may be, this hearty food tradition is bound to satisfy your hunger.
Pão de Queijo [cheese bread]
You don't get a more typical Brazilian snack than pão de queijo. And it is no wonder it is so popular, since there is not much else out there competing with this scrumptious cheese bread- especially when it comes directly from the oven. Often eaten for breakfast, but also just as middle-of-the-day bite to eat. The soft cheesy dough from manioc [cassava] flour is baked until crispy on the outside, but still leaving the inside distinctively chewy and moist. Similar versions are found through South America, but honestly, combined with a short strong Brazilian coffee, there's no classic snack experience quite like it. For those of you with an oven at your fingertips, why not purchase one of the ready-made mixes in the supermarket. Brands such as Yoki and Hikari are some of the more well known. Follow the simple instructions and guaranteed you wont have enough pão de queijo to go around.
Pastéis
Brought to Brazil by the Japanese, these thin pastry turnovers are a little similar to the Spanish fried empanadillas. The pastel is another typical street food fried by vendors throughout the country and there are a number of vegetarian friendly options too. These might include the following or combinations of: muzzarella or catupiry - requeijão [cream] cheese, ovo [egg], cebolas [onions], azeitonas [olives], bananas , goiabada [guava jelly] or even chocolate.
Romeu e Julieta [Romeo and Juliet: Minas cheese and guava paste]
Cheese from the state of Minas Gervas, is traditionally produced in three varieties: frescal [fresh], meia-cura [slightly mature] and curado [matured]. Made from cow's milk, it is matured naturally. Combined with goiabada [guava conserve], the dish is called Romeo and Juliet. Since guava paste comes from various types of fruit, the usual choice to accompany Minas Cheese is goiabada cascão [guava paste]. This makes a fabulous afternoon pick-me up with crackers or crusty bread or simply a special way to end any meal.
Canjica
Similar to American grits, this southern Brazilian porridge dish is made from boiling milhho branco [white corn kernels] in leite [milk], azucar [sugar] and canela [cinnamon] until tender. Often amendoim moído [ ground peanuts] and leite de coco [coconut milk] are added for a more traditional flavour. While it is associated with the festa junina [winter festivals], it is still eaten throughout the year.
Pudim de pão [Bread pudding]
Most bread eating nations of the world have come up with a similar recipe at some time in their culinary history. Basically the same idea as the English 'bread and butter pudding': a great way to use up the stale bread, while keeping every one at the dinner table happy. In Brazil, they add there own special touch by adding dried orange slices and a clove to the sweetened egg and bread batter before baking in the oven.
The Brazilian sweet-tooth
Books have been written about all the delicious confectionary and sugary desserts Brazil has on offer. Here are just a few of the many favourites easily available throughout the country.
Paçoca

Pronounced only one way: pa-SOH-ca, this Brazilian food has two different versions. Vegetarians need to watch out in the northeast, since paçoca s a local dish comprising of ground carne de sol [beef jerky], cassava flour and red onions. It is pulverised using a pilão [mortar] and therefore, in the rest of the country it is usually referred to as paçoca de pilão. This distinguishes it from paçoca, a kind of candy made of ground peanuts and sugar and totally okay for vegetarians and vegans alike. While it used to be something that Mum would make on a special occasion at home, it is now completely commercialised and can be found all over the country in supermarkets and specialised sweet shops. Another extremely popular variety is pé-de-moleque, which often has pieces instead of ground peanuts.
Cocadas
These can be either a candy or a cookie, depending where you are situated in the world. In Brazil, they typically a chewy coconut sweet made with eggs, sugar and shredded coconut. They are sold in jars at local stores, by street vendors or packaged in supermarkets of traditional food outlets. Full of energy and flavour, they are certain to give you a kick start if the energy levels are a bit low.
Chocolate salami
Originally this cylindrical sausage shaped dessert made from dark chocolate, broken cookies, butter, and eggs came from Portugal. Nowadays, however, this choco-holics delight is also proudly produced in Brazil. While, it might have the world salami in its name, it is perfectly alright for vegetarians to enjoy too.
Brigadeiro
No matter how sensitive your teeth are, you cannot travel to Brazil and leave again without sampling at least one brigadeiro. It is Brazils incomplex answer to the truffle. There are two types of candy, depending on how long you cook the sweetened condensed milk; cocoa powder and butter mixture. A soft brigadiero has only been heated until a sticky custard is formed. You then serve this hot in a bowl and very carefully eat it, as it cools with a little spoon. The harder version brigadiero is cooked for much longer and until the smooth paste is thick enough to be rolled into a small balls. They are traditionally served at birthdays covered in chocolate granules or cocoa powder. Nowadays, there doesn't have to be a celebration to sample one. So really, there is no excuse not to try one.
Açaí na tigela [açaí in the bowl]
The açaí palm fruit is prepared differently depending where you are in Brazil. All over Brazil, it can be found as an icecream flavour or added to freshly made juices. In the Amazon region, the pulp is mashed and served either sweet or salty in a gourd with tapioca. In the south they much prefer to make a smooth custard, also served with tapioca, but fancied up a bit with granola and fruit as topping. This is known as açaí na tigela [açaí in the bowl] Due to recent marketing as a dietary supplement, the açaí berry is now sold world-wide in the form of tablets, juice, smoothies, yogurt, instant drink powders, and of course as a fresh fruit. Interestingly enough, the palm heart the plant produces is also considered a delicacy.
Cachaça
Cachaça, pronounced cah-shah-sah, is the Brazilian version of the widespread South American aguardente [fire water]. No matter where the spirit comes from, they are all distilled from sugar cane and have the distinct reputation of causing a nasty hangover if not drunk in moderation. In the northeast, the liquor is usually knocked back neat. A dollop of honey or squeeze of lime adds a bit of flavour variety as does pouring a nip in your coffee. The latter is known as a çafé pingado. But probably the most famous use for Brazil's national alcohol, is in Brazil's national drink, the caipirinha. A deliciously easy to consume cocktail mixed with lime juice, sugar and poured over plenty of ice. Replacing cachaça with vodka results in a caipiroska or caipivodka; white rum becomes a caipiríssima; and less common, but still known: with sake you get a sakerinha. It doesn't really matter which one you choose, they are all a refreshing way to finish off the travel day and watch the life of evening roll in.
Brazilians love their fruit juices and they are known to mix some pretty exotic combinations. Most towns have an abundance of fruit juice bars where you can try a few local favourites:
Manga [manga]: alright it is not so unusual, but it is still one of the best
Maracuja [passion fruit]: maybe a bit too much on its own, but mixed with another fruit this makes a tangy combination
Caju [cashew fruit] not only does this sweet smelling, sweet tasting fruit bear the delicious cashew nut, but it makes a rather distinctive fruit juice too
Açai: a fruit from the Amazon suggested to have beneficial health effects. Though with its unique flavour: not too sweet, a little tart and a hint of chocolate and clove, its worth a try anyway.
Graviola [soursop or prickly custard apple]: Rich in carbohydrate and containing decent amounts of calcium, iron, vitamin B and C, this strange thorny Brazilian pawpaw is definitely going to make a good health shake. Furthermore initial flavour bursts of creamy strawberry and pineapple which give way to banana and coconut finale, are certainly going to make a delicious shake. And that is probably why the Champola: a graviola and milk smoothie can be found from South Mexico to Brazil.
Pitanga [Surinam cherry] : while extracts from the leaves have been used in Brazilian folk medicine for centuries, the fruit makes a great fruit drink and is often used to flavour jams and jellies. Eaten straight from the tree, this spectacular star shaped cherry is high in calcium and vitamin C.

arrow Flavours of Brazil for more wonderful information and photography regarding the Brazilian kitchen.
Bike shops
Curitiba - PR Biketech **
Av. Nossa Sra. Aparecida, 713
CEP 80310 100
Curitiba - Paraná
Tel: 41 3342 5453
  Our experience: good shop, great workshop! Friendly owner with fantastic English. A great find!
   
Foz do Iguaçu - PR Bike Center *
Rua Estanislau Zambrzycki, 303
M'Boicy - Foz do Iguaçu - PR
Mob: 85852200
  Our experience: small shop, but big workshop at the back. Friendly, no English
   
Laranjeiras do Sul - PR Loja do Ciclista *
Rua Marechal C. Rondon, 2181
Laranjeiras do Sul - PR
Tel: 42 3635 1110
  Our experience: small shop with basic Brazilian and Chinese components. Very helpful though, no English... Managed to put a new 36 hole rim to a 32 hole hub and it lasted till we got to Curitiba (360km), without any problems.
   
Porto Alegre - RS

Aguiar Cycles *
Av. Protásio Alves, no 280 sl. 104
Rio Branco - Porto Alegre - RS
(entre Ramiro Barcelos e Mariante)
Mob: 98451331
aguiarcycles@yahoo.com.br

  Our experience: small shop, don't miss it... friendly owner, little English
   
Climate
climate chart Brasilia climate chart Fortaleza
climate chart Manaus climate chart Porto Alegre Brazil
climate chart Rio de Janeiro Brazil climate chart Sao Paolo Brazil
Road distances
Brazil road distance chart

 

Detailed distance chart from our trip through Brazil - April - July 2010 (km/alti)      
   
accomm.:
km
altimetres
  H= hotel / posada . C= camping / trailer park . B= beach camp
P= petrol/gas station (camping opportunity)
         
border Uruguay / Chui Santa Vitória do Palmar
H
20
34
Santa Vitória do Palmar petrol station Ipiranga
H
15
--
petrol station petrol station
P
47
25
petrol station petrol station
P
39
29
petrol station Ecological Reserve of Taim
23
--
Ecological Reserve of Taim turn-off Pelotas
80
63
turn-off Pelotas Rio Gande
H / P
22
17
Rio Grande Estreito
C
46
25
Estreito Bojuru
39
35
Bojuru Tavares
49
49
Tavares Mostardas
H
29
--
Mostardas petrol station Ipiranga
P
26
66
petrol station Ipiranga petrol station Petrobras
P
30
--
petrol station Petrobras Bacopari
P
29
41
Bacopari turn-off Palmares do Sul
P
26
17
turn-off Palmares do Sul Capivari do Sul
P
13
9
Capivari do Sul Capão da Porteira
P
17
10
Capão da Porteira Viamão
H
55
387
         
Foz do Igauçu Medianeira (410)
H
61
700
Medianeira Matelandia (563)
14
306
Matelandia Céu Azul (666)
20
283
Céu Azul Santa Tereza do Oeste (708)
28
274
Santa Terza do Oeste Cascavel (738)
H
15
142
Cascavel turn-off Maringa (747)
10
152
turn-off Maringa Ibema (859)
48
420
Ibema Guaraniacu (823)
18
193
Guaraniacu Laranjeiras do Sul (830)
H
67
1083
Laranjeiras do Sul Vimond (699)
25
343
Vimond Cantagalo (812)
H
9
213
Cantagalo Tres Pineiros (933)
P
23
365
Tres Pineiros Lagoa Seca (921)
3
28
Lagoa Seca turn-off Goioxim (967)
27
255
turn-off Goioxim Guarapuava (1033)
H
24
248
Guarapuava turn-off Ponta Grossa (739)
46
504
turn-off Ponta Grossa turn-off Irati (741)
41
515
turn-off Irati turn-off Palmeira (858)
66
978
turn-off Palmeira turn-off BR376 (1023)
P
30
543
turn-off BR376 turn-off Campo Largo (927)
22
282
turn-off Campo Largo Curitiba (937)
H/P
29
337
         
Curitiba turn-off Estrada da Graciosa (810)
44
378
turn-off Estrada da Graciosa start downhill (872)
5
130
start downhill Morretes (17)
H/P
27
2
Morretes Paranaguá
H/P
42
107
Paranaguá Superagüi (by boat R$20 each)
H
Superagüi Ararapira
C
27
31
Ararapira Marujá (incl. boat R$ 7,50 each)
H
16
13
Marujá Cananéia (by ferry R$ 51 each)
H/P
Cananéia Ilha Comprida
H/C/P
49
20
Ilha Comprida Iguape
H/P
10
10
Iguape top climb (265)
50
406
top climb higway BR116 (31)
7
30
highway BR116 Miracatu (32)
7
48
Miracatu Pedro Barros (22)
P
10
55
Pedro Barros Peruíbe
H
40
234
Peruíbe Itanhaém
H
33
56
Itanhaém Mongaguá
H
19
12
Mongaguá turn-off São Paulo (Imigrantes)
32
98
turn-off São Paulo (Imigrantes) Cubatão
H
4
10
Cubatão turn-off Bertioga
21
140
turn-off Bertioga Bertioga
H/C/P
30
86
Bertioga Boraceía
C
34
55
Boraceía Juquehy
16
92
Juquehy Boiçucanga
C
14
148
Boiçucanga top very steep climb (290)
4
285
top very steep climb Maresias
H/C
6
5
Maresias Barequeçaba
21
499
Barequeçaba São Sebastião
H/C/P
7
101
São Sebastião Caraguatatuba
25
103
Caraguatatuba Massaguaçu
C/P
9
71
Massaguaçu Maranduba
C
18
36
Maranduba Ubatuba
H
27
262
Ubatuba Pereque Açu
H/C
2
6
Pereque Açu Itamambuca (20)
C
10
58
Itatambuca Prumirim (48)
C
6
125
Prumirim Picinguaba (20)
C
19
177
Picinguaba state border (303)
11
294
state border Patrimonio (92)
C
7
15
Patrimonio Paraty (14)
H/C/P
18
37
Paraty São Gonçalo (21)
C
32
142
São Gonçalo Tarituba (30)
H/C
3
30
Tarituba Frade (41)
H
31
340
Frade Bracuhy (43)
C
6
17
Bracuhy Japuiba (20)
H
19
101
Japuiba Angra dos Reis (20)
H
8
64
Angra dos Reis top climb (238)
21
382
top climb Conceicão (19)
7
19
Conceicão Mangaratiba (14)
23
343
Mangaratiba Itaguaí (6)
H
32
238
Itaguaí Santa Cruz (20)
11
80
Santa Cruz turn-off Barra de Guaratiba
22
34
turn-off Barra de Guaratiba Parque Chico Mendes (beach)
12
196
Parque Chico Mendes (beach) end cycle path
17
21
end cycle path Ipanema (Rio de Janeiro)
H
15
175
   
Ipanema (Rio de Janeiro) Niteroi ferry terminal
16
29
Niteroi ferry terminal turn-off Manilha (40)
28
115
turn-off Manilha Magé (32)
H
20
55
Magé Guapimirim (57)
17
80
Guapimirim turn-off Teresópolis (936)
16
886
turn-off Teresópolis Quinta da Barra, turn Teresópolis (904)
H/C
9
110
Quinta da Barra, turn Teresópolis top climb (1345)
13
552
top climb Itaipava (637)
21
19
Itaipava Três Rios (242)
H
46
138
Três Rios Levy Gasparian (261)
11
98
Levy Gasparian Juiz de Fora (669)
H
45
749
Juiz de Fora Ewbank da Câmara (754)
15
168
Ewbank da Câmara Santos Dumont (842)
12
194
Santos Dumont Barbacena (1077)
H
49
723
Barbacena Alfredo Vasconcelos (996)
12
127
Alfredo Vasconcelos Ressaquinha (1071)
11
153
Ressaquinha Carandaí (1036)
15
107
Carandaí Pedra do Sino (1038)
7
112
Pedra do Sino Cristiano Otoni (981)
C
10
77
Cristiano Otoni Conselheiro Lafaiete (897)
H
24
259
Conselheiro Lafaeite Ouro Branco (1002)
H
21
451
Ouro Branco top climb 1 (1215)
8
315
top climb 1 turn-off Itatiaia (1059)
4
74
turn-off Itatiaia top climb 2 (1233)
6
277
top climb 2 top climb 3 (1224)
3
80
top climb 3 top climb 4 (1332)
5
135
top climb 4 Ouro Preto (1059)
H/C
8
83
Ouro Preto top climb (1224)
8
263
top climb Cachoeira do Campo (937)
H
12
70
Cachoeira do Campo turn-off Itabirito (771)
18
163
turn-off Itabirito turn-off Rio Acima (766)
5
75
turn-off Rio Acima top climb (868)
9
180
top climb Rio Acima (664)
15
198
Rio Acima Nova Lima (784)
15
302
Nova Lima top climb (1060)
11
433
top climb Belo Horizonte (846)
H
7
7

 

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